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Fast or Not to Fast

Fasting isn’t a diet.

The literal definition of fasting is to abstain from food and drink from a specific period of time.
It’s been around for thousands of years, as spiritual fasting is a part of many religions. But in this context, I prefer looking at fasting as simply a change in eating patterns.

Fasting – isn’t that starvation?

No. Fasting differs from starvation in one crucial way. Control. Starvation is the involuntary absence of food. It is neither deliberate nor controlled. Fasting, on the other hand, is the voluntary withholding of food for spiritual, health, or other reasons.

Food is easily available, but you choose not to eat it. This can be for any period of time, from a few hours up to days or even weeks on end. You may begin a fast at any time of your choosing, and you may end a fast at will, too. You can start or stop a fast for any reason or no reason at all.

Fasting is nor deprivation. You’re not eating less, you’re eating less often. When you do eat, you eat delicious, healthy foods until you feel satisfied. You won’t have to fear healthy fats, grass-fed meats, organic vegetables, or strategic amounts of healthy carbs. You hold off eating to allow your body to burn its own fat, and then eat until you are full. Does that sound like starvation to you?

Fasting has no standard duration, as it is merely the absence of eating. Anytime that you are not eating, you are fasting. For example, you may fast between dinner and breakfast the next day, a period of approximately 12-14 hours. In that sense, fasting should be considered a part of everyday life. I have been practicing intermittent fasting for 6 month. Now, it is a part of my life.

How does intermittent fasting work?

At its very core, fasting simply allows the body to burn off excess body fat. It is important to realize that this is normal and humans have evolved to fast without detrimental health consequences. Body fat is merely food energy that has been stored away. If you don’t eat, your body will simply “eat” its own fat for energy.

Life is about balance. The good and the bad. The yin and the yang. The same applies to eating and fasting. Fasting, after all, is simply the flip side of eating. If you are not eating, you are fasting. Here’s how it works:

When we eat, more food energy is ingested than can immediately be used. Some of this energy must be stored away for later use. Insulin is the key hormone involved in the storage of food energy.

EAT FOOD——> INCREASE INSULIN ——> STORE SUGAR IN LIVER/PRODUCE FAT IN LIVER

Insulin rises when we eat, helping to store the excess energy in two separate ways. Sugars can be linked into long chains, called glycogen and then stored in the liver. There is, however, limited storage space; and once that is reached, the liver starts to turn the excess glucose into fat. This process is called De-Novo Lipogenesis (meaning literally Making Fat from New).
Some of this newly created fat is stored in the liver, but most of it is exported to other fat deposits in the body. While this is a more complicated process, there is no limit to the amount of fat that can be created. So, two complementary food energy storage systems exist in our bodies. One is easily accessible but with limited storage space (glycogen), and the other is more difficult to access but has unlimited storage space (body fat).

BURN STORED SUGAR/BURN FAT <—— DECREASE INSULIN <—— FASTING/NO FOOD

8 Benefits of Fasting

1. Fasting is an excellent tool for weight loss.

There have been studies that support fasting as an excellent tool for weight loss. One 2015 study found that alternate day fasting trimmed body weight by up to 7 percent and slashed body fat by up to 12 pounds.
Another study, this one out of the University of Southern California, discovered that when 71 adults were placed on a five-day fast (eating between 750 and 1,100 calories a day) once every three months, they lost an average of 6 pounds, reduced inflammation levels and their waistlines and lost total body fat without sacrificing muscle mass. If you want to lose weight and lose belly fat, fasting even irregularly could be the key.

2. Fasting promotes the secretion of human growth hormone.

Human growth hormone, or HGH, is naturally produced by the body, but remains active in the bloodstream for just a few minutes. It’s been effectively used to treat obesity and help build muscle mass, important for burning fat. HGH also helps increase muscle strength, which can help improve your workouts, too. Combine these together and you have an effective fat-burning machine on your hands.

3. Fasting may be good for athletes.

Fasting has been found to have positive effects on body mass as well as other health markers in professional athletes. This is because, as previously mentioned, fasting can effectively shed excess fat, while optimizing muscle growth, because of HGH production. Traditionally, athletes are advised to consume high-quality protein half hour after finishing their workouts (post-workout nutrition) to simultaneously build muscle and reduce fat. Fasting is advised for training days, while eating is encouraged on game days.

4. Fasting is great for normalizing insulin sensitivity.

When your body gets too many carbs and sugar, it can become insulin resistant, which often paves the way for a host of chronic diseases, including type-2 diabetes. If you don’t want to go down this route, it’s critical to keep your body sensitive to insulin. Fasting is an effective way to do this.
A study published in the World Journal of Diabetes found that intermittent fasting in adults with type-2 diabetes improved key markers for those individuals, including their body weight and glucose levels. And another study found that intermittent fasting was as effective as caloric restrictions in reducing visceral fat mass, fasting insulin and insulin resistance. If you’re struggling with pre-diabetes or insulin sensitivity, intermittent fasting can help.

5. Fasting can normalize ghrelin levels.

Ghrelin is known as the hunger hormone, because it is responsible for telling your body that it is hungry. Dieting and really restrictive eating can actually increase ghrelin production, which will leave you feeling hungrier. But when you fast, though you might struggle in the first few days, you’re actually normalizing ghrelin levels.

Eventually, you won’t feel hungry just because it’s your usual meal time. Instead, your body will become more adept in discerning when it actually needs food.

6. Fasting can lower triglyceride levels.

When you consume too much bad cholesterol or too much sugar, your triglyceride levels may shoot up, increasing your risk of heart disease. Intermittent fasting actually lowers those bad cholesterol levels, decreasing triglycerides in the process. Another interesting thing to note is that fasting doesn’t affect the levels of good cholesterol in the body.

7. Fasting may slow down the aging process.

While not yet proven in humans, early studies in rats seem to link intermittent fasting with increased longevity. One study found that intermittent fasting decreased body weight and increased the life span in rats. Another found that a group of mice who fasted intermittently actually lived longer than the control group, although they were heavier than the non-fasting mice. Of course, it’s not clear that the same results would happen in humans, but the signs are encouraging.

8. Fasting increases autophagy.

Autophagy’s main roles are: Remove defective proteins and organelles, prevent abnormal protein aggregate accumulation, and remove intracellular pathogens. So, your body has a chance to clear cellular debris and abnormal cells, like cancerous cells.

Precautions Regarding Fasting.

The health benefits of fasting are extremely appealing, but fasting isn’t always for everyone.

You should not fast if you are:

  • Underweight (BMI < 18.5)
  • Pregnant – you need extra nutrients for your child.
  • Breastfeeding – you need extra nutrients for your child.
  • A child under 18 – you need extra nutrients to grow.

You can fast, but may need supervision, under these conditions:

  • If you have diabetes mellitus – type 1 or type 2.
  • If you take prescription medications.
  • If you have gout or high uric acid.

However, for most of the population, intermittent fasting can be a really helpful tool in managing your weight and health.

Types of Fasting.

Fasting offers infinite flexibility. You can fast for as long or short as you like, but here are some popular regimens. Generally, shorter fasts are done more frequently.

Shorter fasts (<24hrs)

16:8 fast

This involves daily fasting for 16 hours. Sometimes this is also referred to as an 8-hour eating ‘window’. You eat all your meals within an 8-hour time period and fast for the remaining 16 hours. Generally, this is done daily or almost daily.
For example, you may eat all your meals within the time period of 11:00 am and 7:00 pm. Generally, this means skipping breakfast. You generally eat two or three meals within this 8-hour period.

20:4 fast

This involves a 4-hour eating window and a 20-hour fast. For example, you might eat between 2:00 pm and 6:00 pm every day and fast for the other 20 hours. Generally, this would involve eating either one meal or two smaller meals within this period.

Longer fasts (>24 hours)

24-hour fasts

This involves fasting from dinner to dinner (or lunch to lunch). If you eat dinner on day 1, you would skip the next day’s breakfast and lunch and eat dinner again on day 2. This means that you are still eating daily, but only once during that day. This would generally be done two to three times per week.

5:2 fast

Dr. Michael Mosley popularized this variation in his book ‘The Fast Diet’. This involves 5 regular eating days and 2 fasting days. However, on these two fasting days, it is permitted to eat 500 calories on each day. These calories can be consumed at any time during the day – either spread throughout the day, or as a single meal.

36-hour fast

This involves fasting for the entire day. For example, if you eat dinner on day 1, you would fast for all of day 2 and not eat again until breakfast on day 3. This is generally 36 hours of fasting. This provides more powerful weight loss benefit. The other great benefit is that it avoids the temptation to overeat dinner on day 2.

Extended fasting

You can fast almost indefinitely. Generally for fasts greater than 48 hours, I recommend a general multivitamin to avoid micronutrient deficiency. The world record for fasting is 382 days, so going 7-14 days is certainly possible.

I have been doing 3 days fasting for about 9 years and now I start extending my fast to 5 days with just water.

Ready to try a fast? Here’s how to make it easier.

1. Decide what type of fast you’re going to do. 
I recommend easing in with time-restricted eating, starting with 12 hours of fasting. If that feels good after a few days, you can increase the fast to 14 hours and up to 18; I don’t recommend fasting for longer than that.
Have you fasted before? Then you might want to try a more ambitious fast, like alternate day fasting or few days fasting with a bone broth or just water.

2. Set some goals.
What do you want to accomplish by fasting? Lose weight, be healthier, feel better, have more energy? Write it down and put it in a place you’ll see frequently during your fast.

3. Make a menu and stock the fridge. 
Before beginning your fast, decide when you’re eating and what you’ll be eating then. Knowing this in advance takes the pressure off, especially if you feel like you may eat everything in sight “because you can.” As you become more used to fasting, you might find it’s unnecessary to sort out meals beforehand, but I find having a range of healthy food waiting for me in the fridge makes fasting a lot easier.

4. Listen to your body. 
Fasting can take some time to get used to, as your body sheds old habits and learns new ones. But listen to your body! If you’re in hour 10 of 16 hours of fasting and feel like you absolutely need a snack, then have healthy one. If your fasting time is up but you’re not hungry yet, wait until you are. There are no hard and fast rules here. You’re not “messing up.” You might find it helpful to jot down a sentence or two each day about how you felt; you might find that certain times of the  month or year, different types of fasts work better for you.

Here are the ten top tips for easier fasting:

  • Drink water
  • Stay busy
  • Drink coffee or tea (except on water fast)
  • Ride out the hunger waves
  • Consume 2 teaspoon of sea salt per day (mix with water) if you experience discomfort
  • Don’t tell anybody who is not supportive that you are fasting
  • Give yourself one month
  • Follow a low-carb diet between fasting periods. This reduces hunger and makes fasting much easier. It mayalso increase the effect on weight loss and type 2 diabetes reversal, etc.
  • Don’t binge after fasting

If you would like to get more into the science of fasting there is a great book “The Complete Guide to Fasting” by Jason Fung.

Also, you can watch an interview with Dr. Fung.

Have you been fasting for a while and want to challenge yourself? Join me and other health enthusiasts for a 5 days fast “Fasting for a Purpose” on September 23 here.

Do you have more question about fasting? I am here to help and support you.

To your health and happiness.

Your Health Starts in Your Gut

Hippocrates once said, “All disease begins in the gut,” and modern science is proving these words to be true. Many studies show digestive challenges are the root cause of chronic inflammatory diseases, such as autoimmune disorders, various skin challenges, and also have a profound impact on mental health. Diseases of the digestive system, particularly, an underlying condition known as leaky gut syndrome is a rapidly growing modern day epidemic.

Leaky gut, also called increased intestinal permeability, is a condition that occurs when the tight junctions that make-up the wall of the intestines become inflamed and allow undigested food proteins, bacteria, and toxins to leak across the thin lining and into the bloodstream. Once this protective barrier is compromised, the immune system reacts and triggers body-wide inflammation. When the condition is severe, everything that a person consumes becomes an irritant and drives persistent, systemic inflammation, which also increases the risk of developing other chronic diseases.

Various conditions linked to leaky gut:

  • Autoimmune disease
  • Digestive disorders (IBS, Celiac disease, Crohn’s) and food sensitivities
  • Skin disorders such as acne, psoriasis, and eczema
  • Arthritis
  • Autism
  • Depression
  • Chronic fatigue syndrome
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Parkinson’s Disease
  • Kidney Disease
  • Obesity
  • Diabetes

Good gut health is fundamental to our physical and mental wellbeing, yet digestive disorders are more prevalent than ever. We need to make proactive efforts to protect our digestive systems from damage caused by overwhelming external and internal stressors.

Triggers of leaky gut:

Your Diet

  • Gluten
  • Nightshades
  • Sugar
  • GMO
  • Glyphosate from non-organic produce
  • Inflammatory Omega 6/Omega 3 ratio
  • Hydrogenated process oils

Your lifestyle

  • Environmental toxins
  • Sleep deprivation
  • Chronic stress
  • Alcohol

Your history

  • Chronic antibiotic, hormonal or NSAID use
  • Have metals toxicity
  • Chemo or radiation treatment
  • Vitamin/nutrient deficiencies
  • Hormone imbalances
  • Cesarian birth
  • Gut dysbiosis
  • Traumatic brain injuries

Your infection

  • Candida
  • Parasites
  • Viruses
  • H. Pilory
  • Lime disease

Of course, it’s impossible to entirely avoid the modern toxins and stressors that wreak havoc upon our guts. However, we can take steps to avoid known gut destructors and provide our bodies the tools to self-repair as needed.

How to heal it?

  1. Remove triggers as much as possible.
  2. Following the Cellular Healing Diet including prebiotic and naturally fermented foods, homemade bone broth and intermittent fasting.
  3. Implement periodic True Cellular Detox.
  4. Rotating high-quality probiotic supplements.

You will not successfully heal any chronic condition if your gut is not functioning properly. But by taking measures to remove the offending sources of leaky gut, consuming healing foods, fasting, detoxing and taking high-quality supplements, your gut will heal itself and other chronic conditions will improve as well. Making changes can be difficult, but this determines who gets well and who does not.

You can start with Gut Healing recipe.

To learn more about gut testing, diet specifications and True Cellular Detox, join me for a free workshop “Your Health Starts in Your Gut” on June 23 at 12 pm.

Learn more…

detox

10 Day Holistic De-Stress Online Program

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     Tired all the time?

          Something is off, but you’re not sure what?

               Extra pounds cling to you and won’t let go?

                     Like you haven’t slept?

                         Out of control with food cravings?

                              Stressed out, anxious or depressed? 

 

These might be symptoms of a toxic body.

 Let’s clean you up from the inside out!

 

 Good news! It’s easier than you think with the 10 Day Holistic De-Stress Online Program”

 

 

 

 

To have…

  • More energy
  • Clearer thinking
  • A stronger immune system
  • Easier weight loss
  • A more positive attitude
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                                  …And sleep better

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email lara@holisticexpert.org or call 732-735-1527

disruptor

Endocrine Disruptors. How to eliminate them?

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The past half-century has witnessed the large-scale production, use, and disposal of man-made chemicals into our environment. Most of the synthetic chemicals produced in the U.S. lack adequate testing to determine their long-term health effects in humans. But numerous studies show that human exposure to pesticides, solvents, herbicides, insecticides, certain plastics, and manufacturing byproducts in our environment can cause adverse health effects. Since these products interfere with our internal hormonal balance, we call them hormone-disrupting compounds.

Endocrine disruptors or xeno-hormones are a category of chemicals that alter the normal function of hormones. Normally, our endocrine system releases hormones that signal different tissues telling them what to do. When chemicals from the outside get into our bodies, they have the ability to mimic our natural hormones; blocking or binding hormone receptors. This is particularly detrimental to hormone sensitive organs like the uterus and the breast, the immune and neurological systems, as well as human development.
Here are some endocrine disrupters linked to adverse health effects:

Dioxins are byproducts of industrial incineration and combustion. Also produced by the manufacturing of chlorine-containing pesticides, wood preservatives, and paper, dioxins persist in the environment for years and accumulate in the fat of farm animals that eat contaminated feed or water. Recent research has shown that exposure to low levels of dioxin in the womb and early in life can both permanently affect sperm quality and lower the sperm count in men during their prime reproductive years. But that’s not all! Dioxins are very long-lived, build up both in the body and in the food chain, are powerful carcinogens and can also affect the immune and reproductive systems.
How to avoid it? That’s pretty difficult, since the ongoing industrial release of dioxin has meant that the American food supply is widely contaminated. Products including meat, fish, milk, eggs and butter are most likely to be contaminated, but you can cut down on your exposure by eating fewer animal products.

Bisphenol A is a compound in some plastics. It can leach into foods and the environment. Bisphenol A produces estrogen like effects making it a possible contributor to immune suppression, and some cancers. BPA has been linked to everything from breast and others cancers to reproductive problems, obesity, early puberty and heart disease, and according to government tests, 93 percent of Americans have BPA in their bodies!
How to avoid it? Go fresh instead of canned – many food cans are lined with BPA – or research which companies don’t use BPA or similar chemicals in their products. Say no to receipts, since thermal paper is often coated with BPA. And avoid plastics marked with a “PC,” for polycarbonate, or recycling label #7.

Phthalates are added to plastic to make them strong, soft, and flexible. These toxins are also used in carpet backing, paints, glues, insect repellents, hair spray, nail polish, and even in toys, where they make their way into our bodies through ingestion, inhalation, and skin absorption. Phthalates hormone-disrupting effects have been found to suppress ovulation and estradiol production and to contribute to a condition called polycystic ovarian syndrome. Studies have shown that phthalates can trigger what’s known as “death-inducing signaling” in testicular cells, making them die earlier than they should. Yep, that’s cell death – in your man parts. If that’s not enough, studies have linked phthalates to hormone changes, lower sperm count, less mobile sperm, birth defects in the male reproductive system, obesity, diabetes and thyroid irregularities.
How to avoid it? A good place to start is to avoid plastic food containers, children’s toys (some phthalates are already banned in kid’s products), and plastic wrap made from PVC, which has the recycling label #3. Some personal care products also contain phthalates, so read the labels and avoid products that simply list added “fragrance,” since this catch-all term sometimes means hidden phthalates.

DDT is a pesticide and its metabolite DDE have been banned in this country since 1972, but their effects still linger in our environment, accumulating in adipose tissue and in the food chain(fish and animals). Some other country like China still uses DDT. An insecticide used in agriculture and mosquito control, DDT has estrogen effects, linked to pancreatic, liver and breast cancers. In general, most families will be exposed to this dangerous manmade chemical by eating food or drinking liquids contaminated with small amounts of DDT.
How to avoid it? Use organic produce and animal product. Avoid fish and other food from China. A good water filter can also reduce your exposure to DDE in drinking water.

Formaldehyde is another toxic compound. Traditionally used as a laboratory preservative, it has made its way into our homes. Formaldehyde is used in some shampoos, conditioners, and cosmetics as well as in construction materials, cleaning supplies, carpeting, drapes, upholstery, paper products, and plastics. Its fumes can cause depression, fatigue, poor memory, headaches, asthma, cough, skin rashes, and other problems. Formaldehyde has also been linked to reduced fertility and spontaneous abortion (miscarriage).
How to avoid it? The best way to reduce your exposure is to avoid products that contain formaldehyde, and to not allow cigarette smoking in your home. Increase ventilation. Open your windows for 5-10 minutes once or twice a day to purge chemicals and freshen the air. Run the exhaust fan above your stove when you are cooking to increase outgassing from gas combustion and reduce formaldehyde.

Atrazine is an herbicide. Researchers have found that exposure to even low levels of atrazine can turn male frogs into females that produce completely viable eggs. Atrazine is widely used on the majority of corn crops in the United States, and consequently it’s a pervasive drinking water contaminant. Atrazine has been linked to breast tumors, delayed puberty and prostate inflammation in animals, and some research has linked it to prostate cancer in people.
How to avoid it? Buy organic produce and get a drinking water filter certified to remove atrazine.

Perchlorate is a naturally occurring and manmade chemical. It is manufactured and used as an industrial chemical and can be found in rocket propellant, explosives, fireworks and road flares. It has been found in some public drinking water systems and in food.Who needs food tainted with rocket fuel?! When perchlorate gets into your body it competes with the nutrient iodine, which the thyroid gland needs to make thyroid hormones. Basically, this means that if you ingest too much of it you can end up altering your thyroid hormone balance. This is important because it’s these hormones that regulate metabolism in adults and are critical for proper brain and organ development in infants and young children.
How to avoid it? You can reduce perchlorate in your drinking water by installing a reverse osmosis filter. As for food, it’s pretty much impossible to avoid perchlorate, but you can reduce its potential effects on you by making sure you are getting enough iodine in your diet. Eating iodized salt is one good way.

Fire retardants. In 1999, some Swedish scientists studying women’s breast milk discovered something totally unexpected: The milk contained an endocrine-disrupting chemical found in fire retardants, and the levels had been doubling every five years since 1972! These incredibly persistent chemicals, known as Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB’s) and Polybrominated biphenyls (PBB’s) or polybrominated diphenyl (PBDE) used in coolant, lubricants, and insulation for electrical equipment as well as in paints, dyes, and rubber. PCB’s accumulate in human fat-and in the food chain. Found in rivers and lakes, these toxins weaken the immune system, damage neurological development, and behave like estrogen in the body. These chemicals can imitate thyroid hormones in our bodies and disrupt their activity. That can lead to lower IQ, among other significant health effects. While several kinds of PBDEs have now been phased out, this doesn’t mean that toxic fire retardants have gone away. PBDEs are incredibly persistent, so they’re going to be contaminating people and wildlife for decades to come.
How to avoid it? It’s virtually impossible, but passing better toxic chemical laws that require chemicals to be tested before they go on the market would help reduce our exposure. A few things that can you can do in the meantime include: use a vacuum cleaner with a HEPA filter, which can cut down on toxic-laden house dust; avoid reupholstering foam furniture; take care when replacing old carpet (the padding underneath may contain PBDEs).

Lead. It’s well known that lead is toxic, especially to children. Lead harms almost every organ system in the body and has been linked to a staggering array of health effects, including permanent brain damage, lowered IQ, hearing loss, miscarriage, premature birth, increased blood pressure, kidney damage and nervous system problems. But few people realize that one other way that lead may affect your body is by disrupting your hormones. In animals, lead has been found to lower sex hormone levels. Research has also shown that lead can disrupt the hormone signaling that regulates the body’s major stress system (called the HPA axis). You probably have more stress in your life than you want, so the last thing you need is something making it harder for your body to deal with it – especially when this stress system is implicated in high blood pressure, diabetes, anxiety and depression.
How to avoid it? Keep your home clean and well maintained. Crumbling old paint is a major source of lead exposure, so get rid of it carefully. A good water filter can also reduce your exposure to lead in drinking water. And if you need another reason to eat better, studies have also shown that children with healthy diets absorb less lead.

Arsenic isn’t just for murder mysteries anymore. In fact, this toxin is lurking in your food and drinking water. If you eat enough of it, arsenic will kill you outright. In smaller amounts, arsenic can cause skin, bladder and lung cancer. Basically, bad news. Less well known: Arsenic messes with your hormones! Specifically, it can interfere with normal hormone functioning in the glucocorticoid system that regulates how our bodies process sugars and carbohydrates. What does that mean for you? Well, disrupting the glucocorticoid system has been linked to weight gain/loss, protein wasting, immunosuppression, insulin resistance (which can lead to diabetes), osteoporosis, growth retardation and high blood pressure.
How to avoid it? Reduce your exposure by using a water filter that lowers arsenic levels. For help finding a good water filter.

Mercury. Caution: That sushi you are eating could be hazardous to your health. Mercury, a naturally occurring but toxic metal, gets into the air and the oceans primarily though burning coal. Eventually, it can end up on your plate in the form of mercury-contaminated seafood. Pregnant women are the most at risk from the toxic effects of mercury, since the metal is known to concentrate in the fetal brain and can interfere with brain development. Mercury is also known to bind directly to one particular hormone that regulates women’s menstrual cycle and ovulation, interfering with normal signaling pathways. In other words, hormones don’t work so well when they’ve got mercury stuck to them! The metal may also play a role in diabetes, since mercury has been shown to damage cells in the pancreas that produce insulin, which is critical for the body’s ability to metabolize sugar.
How to avoid it? For people who still want to eat (sustainable) seafood with lots of healthy fats but without a side of toxic mercury, wild salmon and farmed trout are good choices.

The perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) used to make non-stick cookware can stick to you. Perfluorochemicals are so widespread and extraordinarily persistent that 99 percent of Americans have these chemicals in their bodies. One particularly notorious compound called PFOA has been shown to be “completely resistant to biodegradation.” In other words, PFOA doesn’t break down in the environment – ever. That means that even though the chemical was banned after decades of use, it will be showing up in people’s bodies for countless generations to come. This is worrisome, since PFOA exposure has been linked to decreased sperm quality, low birth weight, kidney disease, thyroid disease and high cholesterol, among other health issues. Scientists are still figuring out how PFOA affects the human body, but animal studies have found that it can affect thyroid and sex hormone levels.
How to avoid it? Skip non-stick pans as well as stain and water-resistant coatings on clothing, furniture and carpets.

Organophosphate pesticides. Neurotoxic organophosphate compounds that the Nazis produced in huge quantities for chemical warfare during World War II were luckily never used. After the war ended, American scientists used the same chemistry to develop a long line of pesticides that target the nervous systems of insects. Despite many studies linking organophosphate exposure to effects on brain development, behavior and fertility, they are still among the more common pesticides in use today. A few of the many ways that organophosphates can affect the human body include interfering with the way testosterone communicates with cells, lowering testosterone and altering thyroid hormone levels.
How to avoid it? Buy organic produce that have the fewest pesticide residues. Use “dirty dozen, clean fifteen” guide.

Glycol Ethers. Shrunken testicles: Do we have your full attention now? This is one thing that can happen to rats exposed to chemicals called glycol ethers, which are common solvents in paints, cleaning products, brake fluid and cosmetics. Worried? You should be. The European Union says that some of these chemicals “may damage fertility or the unborn child.” Studies of painters have linked exposure to certain glycol ethers to blood abnormalities and lower sperm counts. And children who were exposed to glycol ethers from paint in their bedrooms had substantially more asthma and allergies.
How to avoid it? Start using clean household and personal care products. Avoid products with ingredients such as 2-butoxyethanol (EGBE) and methoxydiglycol (DEGME).

It’s easy to become overly anxious about the amount of toxins to which we are exposed to ever day. But who wants to live in a bubble? While it’s nearly impossible to completely eliminate these toxic compounds from our lives, we can educate ourselves in ways to minimize our exposure to these compounds and how to support the body in metabolizing and eliminating toxins. Avoiding hormone-disrupting compounds begins simply with the choices we make at home and the store, increasing the demand for safer alternatives.
Normally, our bodies are equipped to metabolize and eliminate toxins through the process of detoxification. But when we are daily bombarded with so many chemicals from so many sources, our bodies can become overburdened. Luckily, we can use diet and supplements to assist our bodies in breaking down toxins and supporting natural hormone balance. Let’s detox.

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It’s easier than you think with the 10 Days Holistic Detox Online Program

To have…
• More energy
• Clearer thinking
• A stronger immune system
• Easier weight loss
• A more positive attitude
• Fewer cravings
​​​​
…And sleep better
For more information click here

 

 

 

why

Why did my body give up on me?

Before I reached 32 years old, I had migraines, chronic fatigue, allergies and digestion problems. My husband and I wanted a baby, but I couldn’t seem to get pregnant. I was still young but my health was on a downward spiral for no apparent reason.

One day I collapsed in the bathroom. At that point, I determined that I would find an answer to the question; “Why was my body giving up on me?’

You see, I was an OBGYN specializing in infertility, and still, I didn’t understand what was going on with me. All our test results showed both my husband and I were healthy and should be able to conceive.

The good news is I did find the answer. Read on to find out what I learned…

The EPA reports 87,000 new chemicals are produced every year. Most of them end up in our body in one way or another.

Do any of these problems sound familiar to you?

• Sugar cravings
• Depression
• Chronic fatigue
• Weight gain
• Infertility

Chances are you have them yourself or know someone who does, The problem is that many people suffer from them for a very long time and can not find a real solution.

I found an explanation for all of them, even why I couldn’t get pregnant. When I conceived our first child, I was on the right track. After struggling to have my second child, I entered training to learn the holistic approach to manage chronic conditions, so I could help others.

I learned about a group of chemicals called xeno-hormones that interfere with our natural hormonal balances. Hormones control almost every function of your body. Is it any wonder we feel so bad?

So, where are we picking up these xeno-hormones?

Here are just a few places:

• Tap water and bottled water
• Non-organic fresh vegetables and fruit
• Non-organic meats and dairy
• Shampoo, soaps, toothpaste
• Flame retardants in children’s clothing
• Cookware, utensils, and kitchen products
• Detergents, cleaning products
• Canned foods
• Plastic bottles
• Office products
• Baby products
• Toys
• Computers, televisions and electronics
• Carpet and linoleum
• Processed foods
• Dental sealants

Even the cash-register receipt you hold in your hand as you leave the store contains xeno-hormones. 

How do they work?

Some cause over-stimulation, making the thyroid or other glands work too hard. Others take the place of the true hormone and block the real one from connecting. The fake hormone messes with your system and havoc sets in.

Unborn children exposed to these xeno-hormones can have changes to the timing of puberty and make them more susceptible to disease all their lives.

Some say these effects could go on for several future generations, even if those chemicals were stopped right now.

Research found that many disorders and disease related to xeno-hormone exposure:

• Breast, uterine, & ovarian cancers
• Prostate and testicular cancer
• Decreased fertility
• Breast development in men
• Heart disease
• Type 2 Diabetes
• Obesity
• Thyroid Problems
• Endometriosis
• Uterine Fibroids

On April 11, I’m holding a free webinar to share more of my story of how I overcame my health issues related to xeno-hormones and other substances, click here.

During the Webinar:

  • I will help you become aware of these toxins so you can avoid them. 

 

  • I will also tell you how to get them out of your body now. 

Your health and the health of your family is affected by xeno-hormones and other toxins. Be sure to listen in to the webinar. These 60 minutes could save the life of someone you love and that someone may be you.

Date: April 11, 2016
Time: 7:30 p.m. Eastern
 
To register for free click here.

See you there.
With love and support,

Larisa Sharipova, MD